THE THRILLING DETECTIVE WEB SITE STAFF


Without whom this site would not have been possible...

Editor-in-Chief:
Kevin Burton Smith

Fiction Editors
Gerald So

Fiction Editor Emeritus
Victoria Esposito-Shea

Reviewer-at-Large
Lily Gardner

Film & TV Editor
Chris Bldemor

Contributors, Regulars & Drive-Bys
Anders Ahlerup
Chris Baldemor
a Beeper
Peter M. Bellani
Marcel Bernadac
Jim Blue
Booster 67
John Boyle
Geoff Bradley
Randal Brandt
Diana Killian
Nathalie Bumpeau
Bryan Clough
Max Allan Collins
Colin Clynes
Bill Crider
Glen Davis
O'Neil De Noux
William Denton
Dermot
Ron DeSourdis
Dave Dial
Jim Doherty
Wayne D. Dundee
Philip Eagle
Bryan English
Sue Feder
Ted Fitzgerald
Jack French
Christopher Friesen
Mark Geldmeyer
Christopher Gooch
Ed Gorman
Christopher Gumprich
Al Guthrie
Bill Hagen
Greg Harness
Mike Harris
John Heaton
Monte Herridge
Don B. Hilliard
Allen J. Hubin
Cameron Hughes
Rudyard Kennedy
Marcia Kiser
Terrill Lankford
Darren Latta
Robert Lee
Laurent Lehmann
Hugh Lessig
Steve Lewis
Dick Lochte
Keith Logan
Geoff Loker
Janice Long
Dennis Lynds
Marianne Macdonald
Jane Maranghi
Todd Mason
Don McGregor
Christopher Mills
Richard Moore
Gary Warren Niebuhr
Jenifer Nightingale
David Nobriga
Juri Nummelin
George Pelecanos
J. Kingston Pierce
Bill Pronzini
James Reasoner
Corey Recko
Rick Robinson
Brian D. Rubendall
Michael Ryan
Kerry Schooley
Duke Seabrook
Gerald So
James Stephenson
Dale Stoyer
Mark Sullivan
Duane Swierczynski
Mario Taboada
Dick Tartow
George Upper
Peter Walker
David White
James R. Winter
Stewart Wright


Kevin Burton Smith
E-mail: kvnsmith@thrillingdetective.com

URL: http://www.kevinburtonsmith.com
If you don't see a byline in a page on this site, chances are I wrote it, unless I didn't... I'm currently the founder/editor/web guy for The Thrilling Detective Web Site. My writings on crime fiction, music, film, bicycling and sundry other topics have appeared in web and print publications all over the world, including Details, the late, lamented Blue Murder, The Mystery Readers Journal, Word Wrights, Over My Dead Body, Crime Time (Britain) and Crime Factory (Australia). At the present time, I'm a contributing editor to Mystery Scene, and an infrequent contributor to The Rap Sheet and January Magazine. I've been a member of DAPA-Em and The Private Eye Writers of America, and have been a lively and outspoken member of several crime fiction-related discussion groups on the internet, most notably Rara-Avis and Wicked Company (One of my initial claims to fame was my having been kicked off DorothyL several times -- a claim that has since been refuted by the moderator). Oh, and I keep threatening to write the Great Montreal private eye novel. I was born and grew up in and around Montreal, but lately I've been seen lurking around the Los Angeles area with my partner in crime, Diana Killian, who knows plenty about wickedness, but zip about hockey or good smoked meat.

Fiction Editor
Gerald So
Having watched P.I. and cop shows since childhood, Gerald's been an avid reader of P.I. and crime fiction since 1993. His own fiction has appeared in
Hardluck Stories, Shred of Evidence, Shots, Thieves Jargon, Demolition, and others. He's also TV/film columnist for Mysterical-E, a reviewer for Crimespree Cinema and Nasty. Brutish. Short., and moderator of DetecToday, Spenser's Sneakers, and CrimeSeen.

Fiction Editor Emeritus
Victoria Esposito-Shea
Victoria swears she's going to put "freelance everything" on her next business cards. As well as working as fiction editor for Thrilling Detective for close to two years,and serving as editor-in-chief and co-founder of HandHeldCrime, she works freelance doing legal research and drafting, editing, translating, and tutoring. She's been interested in crime fiction ever since she can remember and still reads entirely too much; other interests include karate, home brewing, and sleeping. Victoria lives in Canton, NY with her husband, daughters, and various pets.

Reviewer-at-Large
Lily Gardner
E-mail: lilygardnerbutts@gmail.com

The author of A Bitch Called Hope, which introduces Portland, Oregon P.I. Lennox Cooper, and our Reviewer at Large. And her web site is worth it just for the mini-pub crawl through Portland.

Film/Television Editor
Chris Baldemor
E-mail: bigbird366@yahoo.com
Our Film/Television editor is, by his own admission, a big P.I. TV/movies fan. Chris was born in Manila, Philippines, but grew up in Long Beach, CA. He has a degree in Journalism from California State University Long Beach and his first job after graduating was as an English teacher in Japan. After a two year stint overseas, he worked at various places until I landed a job as a caption writer for PhotoEdit, a small private photostock agency based in downtown Long Beach, but his beat is the world: his ever-expanding list of P.I. films and TV shows I've missed, Coming Distractions, has kept me busy for years...

Roving Editor
Dale Stoyer
An Engineer in the computer industry, Dale is based in Buffalo, NY, and has a lot of time in airports and hotels to read. Most of what he reads is mystery fiction, and he enjoys it in most of its flavors from cozy to hardboiled and from juvenile to adult thriller. He particularly enjoys reading about series characters, but hates the wait between books. The list of sleuths/authors he favours is long and rambling, but he considers these the cream: Rex Stout, Lawrence Block, Robert Parker, Donald Westlake (and Stark and Coe). You get the idea...

Contributors:
A tip of the fedora to these guys. People come and people go, but my gratitude to these people is as constant as the Nortth Star. Without their contributions to the site, it wouldn't be half as good as it is, or half as much fun for me to do. As well as contributing entire files, many of their comments , and mine, are included throughout the site, usually in the "From The Peanut Gallery" or "Under Oath"sections. Their suggestions and advice have been invaluable. If they want me, I'll be in the bar...

Anders Ahlerup
Anders, our man in Sweden, has studied and worked in television and film as a producer, cameraman, sound engineer, mixer and editor. He's also an experienced photographer, having worked in both stills and film, and has studied and written about film history and sailing. He's edited a nautical magazine, and has served as a consultant to the shipping trade. He's also written three adventure-thrillers (un-published so far). He's married, and has not yet decided what to be when he grows up. His passions include film, television (particularly American crime shows, music (he prefers film music), travel and sailing.

Ray Banks
Ray Banks has been a student, a salesman, a croupier, and varying degrees of disgruntled office monkey. He was born in Kirkcaldy, but subsequently dragged from the frozen wastes to the north of England, where he discovered that it was just as cold as where he'd been born. Schooled and bullied, he sought solace in crap teenage poetry and horror novels, before creating private eye Cal Innes. His first novel, The Big Blind, is currently being touted to the lowest bidder. Meanwhile he works as a receptionist, but maintains his heterosexuality.

Beeper (AKA Steven J.A. Zimmerman)
Our Gopher State correspondent. Beeper's a former B.Dalton manager who loves mysteries, sports, surfing the web, and working on the great American novel, despite limited typing skill. He's a dropout of the U. of Minnesota. Son of a lawyer and police dispatcher, mysteries were sort of a given. He cut his teeth on Spenser, Looking for Rachel Wallace being his first. He lives in Bloomington, Minnesota, five minutes from the largest mall in the U.S., where his attempts to curb Republican sentiments have so far proven to be futile. A real fan of the contemporary P.I., Beeper has contributed several pages to the site. His specialties are Minnesota mysteries, lesbian sleuths, and ex-jock gumshoes.

Peter M. Bellani
Peter's an expatriate from the Philippines and a comic book fan currently working as an architectural designer for a curtain wall firm in Thailand. Aside from his job, he writes PC gaming reviews for the Bangkok Post during his spare time. His hobbies include collecting comic books (good art and stories) and pocket books. He's currently trying to collect books by Mickey Spillane, Dashiell Hammett and Ross Macdonald, whenever he can find them. Of the three, he is "more partial to Spillane's Mike Hammer books and have thus collected a majority of the series, missing out on only a few."

Marcel Bernadac
Our French connection, Marcel has supplied us with loads of info about the private eye scene in France. He's both a card player and a soccer fan and these two hobbies--among others--require plenty of time, but he's managed to make several contributions to this site, covering the French and European crime fiction scene. And lately he's been working on his own Le récit policiers d'expression française, a great new website about French detectives in books, film, and television stories, and Bandes dessinées d'inspiration policière, which covers comics. Check 'em out, they're great!

J. Michael Blue
J. Michael Blue is the author of two mystery novels, a collection of short stories, and more than 150 stories, articles, and essays. His short fiction has won several awards, and his novel, Justified Crimes was chosen as one of the Ten Best Hard-Boiled Novels of 2000 by Plots With Guns. Jim is also the author of a P.I. novel, A Favor For Zodiac, featuring Micki Garrity.

Bluefox808
Marcus Lindy Sortijas (or bluefox808, as he persists in signing his letters) is a high school senior from Honolulu, Hawaii. He got his first introduction to PI novels by grabbing a "Hardy Boys: Casefiles" adventure in a bookstore just before his mother took him furniture-shopping for several torturing hours. That was 6th grade. Now he is a fan of private eyes Travis McGee, Patrick Kenzie & Angela Gennaro, Ben Perkins, Morgan Hunt, Elvis Cole, John Marshall Tanner, Amos Walker, Nameless, Matthew Scudder, and John Caine. He thanks the Thrilling Detective Website for introducing him to so many heroes who don't like to be called heroes. Currently, Marcus is at work trying to create his own private eye series. His hare-brained idea is to somehow meld Shakespearean turns of phrase, Agatha Christie-style surprise plots, John Woo action sequences, and Alfred Hitchcock suspense with classic hard-boiled noir. Marcus is hoping a Master's of Fine Arts in Creative Writing will give him the skills to make it happen.

Alberta Bond
Alberta is a long-time mystery reader and contributor to this site who values her privacy.

Booster67 (AKA Michael Ryan)
We'll let Booster67 speak for himself: "I'm 26. Live in Dallas, Texas. I'm single no kids I go to school and I work. I want to perhaps be a photojournalist. Some of my favorite eyes include Spenser, Stephanie Plum, Milan Jacovich, Burke, Harry Stoner, Hap Collins and Leonard Pine and Mongo. I'm into cooking, write a bit, dance, flirt. I work in a restaurant. Like Calvin and Hobbes, Foxtrot, Peanuts and Bizarro comic strips. I have only been reading detectives since the start of the year."

Etienne Borgers

John Boyle
Our automotive and helicopter expert (he does the Car and Chopper Talk sections) John's a lifelong TV fan and a public affairs officer in the USAF, living somewhere in Texas. TV series have led him to his two most rewarding (and expensive) hobbies...buying and restoring one of the George Barris Stutz Bearcat replicas built for the 1971 CBS series "Bearcats!" and learning how to fly a vintage Bell 47 helicopter...(prompted by the 1950s syndicated hit "Whirlybirds"). For those younger people out there, the Bell 47 is the type seen on MASH. And like Columbo, John has a basset hound...well, actually two since he just took in a refugee from the animal shelter. Obviously, John has a very understanding wife. (Understanding? Hell, she's a saint!)

With interests like those, it shouldn't be too surprising to learn that John's hobbies are aviation history and to a lesser extend, auto history. He's also a frequent contributor to a Canadian-based Bell 47 website. As far as John's mystery tastes go, his sunny disposition and need for happy endings predisposes him more towards Magnum than some of the heavier film noir stuff. But being a journalist, he does appreciate a well tuned phrase... his ideal hero would be a mix of Bogart and Groucho Marx. And, after looking at the resumes of some of our other contributors, John thought I might mention that he has a BA in Journalism, History and Broadcasting, and an MA in Mass Communication.

Geoff Bradley
Geoff Bradley, who hails from Essex, England, is the editor and publisher of the British magazine CADS.

Randal Brandt
Randal's a librarian at the University of California, Berkeley. On vacation in Mexico City in 1994, he contracted a mild case of la turista. His wife thought he might feel better if she read aloud to him from a book she had brought on the trip, a tattered paperback copy of The Long Escape by David Dodge. Since then he has been an avid collector of Dodge books, and he's the creator/manager of the official David Dodge Web Site, in collaboration with the author's daughter, with the goal of bringing attention to a forgotten author who deserves to be read and remembered. And as if that's not enough, he also maintains the Golden Gate Mysteries web site, a comprehensive bibliography of crime fiction set in the San Francisco Bay area.

Steve Brown
A real-life private eye, and the author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to Private Investigating (2002, Alpha Books).

D.L. Browne
Mystery novelist, critic, and the Thrilling Detective Web Guy's sweet baboo. Writes mystery novels as Diana Killian.

Nathalie Bumpeau
Nathalie is a long-time contributor to this site who prefers to keep her private life private. My guess is there are outstanding warrants.

Eric Chambers
Eric is a teacher of Literacy/Numeracy in NSW Australia who got seriously interested in the PI genre when he picked up a Chandler paperback. "The quality of the writing is one of the yardsticks I use," he says. Besides Chandler he's really enjoyed Larry Beinhart’s Tony Cassella, Leo Malet’s Nestor Burma, Randy Wayne White’s Doc Ford, Roger L Simon’s Moses Wine and from his own country, Peter Temple’s Jack Irish.

Bryan Clough
Bryan is the author of such non-fiction works as Approaching Zero (1990), the story of phreakers, hackers and computer virus writers and Cheating at Cards (1992), the story of credit card fraud. Bryan contributed our biography on Peter Cheyney, who will be featured in his forthcoming book Malignant Moles, a look at the symbiotic relationships between the British fascist parties and the State Security services between the wars. It also shows how MI5 fabricated evidence in 1940 to stitch up some small fry while the big fish got away. "The usual story," as Bryan puts it.

Max Allan Collins
Max is the creator of private eyes Nate Heller and Ms. Tree, among about a zillion others, and is on his way to becoming a multi-media mogul, working in novels and short stories, comics and film, music and Lord knows-what-else. He still somehow finds time to drop us a line now and then, and not just to keep us up to date on his own projects, either, although, in his case, that would be enough. See his bio.

Colin Clynes
Colin lives in Birmingham, England. A fan of U S crime / hardboiled novels, his favourite authors are Lawrence Block, Jacob Asch, Robert Crais and Rob Kantner. His favourite UK writer is Mark Timlin. He's also a fan of Old Time Radio. Other interests include comics, 70's and 80's vigilante series, and spaghetti western-influenced UK Western series of 70's and 80's.

Bill Crider
Bill lives in Alvin, Texas (not named for the chipmunk). He won the Anthony award for his first mystery novel, Too Late To Die, featuring Sheriff Dan Rhodes. The most recent book in that series is A Romantic Way to Die. Crider and his wife, Judy, won the "best short story" Anthony in 2002 for "Chocolate Moose," a Dan Rhodes short story. Crider also writes
several other series, one about Truman Smith, a private eye who lives in Galveston, another about a university English teacher named Carl Burns, and one about Sally Good, a community college teacher. The first Truman Smith book, Dead on the Island, was nominated for a Shamus award. Stand-alone novels include The Texas Capitol Murders, and Blood Marks.

Glen Davis
Glen is a native of the Golden State, where he is an agriculturalist with an MA in history from California State Universtiy, Chico.  When he is not helping to feed the world, he reads a lot of mysteries.

O'Neil De Noux
Our first real-life private eye! After leaving law enforcement, New Orleans author O'Neil De Noux was a private-eye for six years. He now works as a computer graphics designer to supplement his income as a writer. He also teaches mystery writing at The University of New Orleans. Since 1988, he has had several novels published, including Grim Reaper, The Big Kiss, Blue Orleans, Crescent City Kills and the newest, The Big Show from Pontalba Press, 1998. His true-crime book, Specific Intent, was a main selection of the Doubleday Book Club. He has also had over sixty short stories published since 1990. His series character, New Orleans Detective Dino LaStanzas, has appeared in five novels and over a dozen short stories. He's also created New Orleans private eye Lucien Caye, and several other police procedural series, featuring such NOPD officers as Jacques Dugas (a cop in the 1890's) and Detective John Raven Beau.

William Denton
Rare bird William Denton is neat, clean, bearded and sober, and doesn't care who knows it.

Frank Derato
Our expert on The Falcon.

Dermot
Home is Northern Ireland but I'm now living in Manchester. If you ever want an alternate opinion to my stuff, you should try the no alibis bookstore on Botanic Avenue, Belfast -- the staff are very knowledgeable.

Ron DeSourdis
Being a member of the "staff" here is just icing on the cake for Ron. His chief claim to fame was the publication of The Films of Alan Ladd, which he co-authored with Marilyn Henry, in 1981. "Like a lot of my fellow baby-boomers, I became a movie buff in the 1970's. Not sure whether my interest in detective literature came before or after, but both these preoccupations have crossed that bridge to the 21st century. Have read all of Hammett and Chandler that I could get my hands on; more recent authors I've enjoyed have been Robert Parker (the Spensers exclusively, although now I read them more out of habit than anything), Lawrence Block (strictly Scudder), Elmore Leonard, and Michael Connelly (Bosch is a cop, I know, but otherwise fits the loner/tough-tender/iconoclast persona so perfectly that to make him a gumshoe would probably tip him over into caricature). Have read a few James Lee Burkes, but never really got hooked. And if I ever feel a deep need to be sick to my stomach, I may pick up another James Ellroy. But... the cruelest, most disgusting and inexcusable murder case I have come across on the twisted trail to today is what Robert Altman did to The Long Goodbye.

Dave Dial
Dave lives in the LA area, where he spends his time surfing the net while watching late night television.

Jim Doherty
Jim Doherty was born in San Francisco, educated at Bellarmine Prep (a Jesuit high school in San Jose) and UC Berkeley. He started his law enforcement career, while still an undergrad, as a part-time civilian employee of the UC campus police , and went on to become a city cop in Berkeley, CA. He's currently a Chicagoan working as a federal law officer in one of the more obscure government cop shops. His wife, Katy, is a native Midwesterner whom he met in the Windy City at the church they both attended. Jim's written dozens of articles and reviews, but his first piece of crime fiction (a cop story, natch) was recently published in Mystery Buff. Under a pseudonym, he's also written a PI story about a Chicago op named Errol Pucinski (which hasn't sold yet), and Katy and he are collaborating on another series about a crime-solving couple who own a B&B in a Midwestern resort area.

Wayne D. Dundee
Wayne is the creator of the Joe Hannibal private eye series, of which The Fight in the Dog is the latest. He's also the founder of the seminal Hardboiled Magazine back in the eighties, which published many of the up-and-coming hard-boiled turks of the day, making him a sort of spiritual father to "The New Pulp."

Anthony Durrant
Anthony was born and raised in Ottawa, Canada, and moved back there from his dad's hometown in the Haldimand-Norfolk area of Ontario.  He loves to read, write, listen to music - particularly albums of stage musicals - and write stories, usually pen and ink, but he's thinking of starting to using a word porcessor.

Philip Eagle
Philip Eagle is currently helping to sub-edit a scientific web information service. He lives in a small English country town which lives up to Mr. Holmes' famous remarks in "The Copper Beaches."

Bryan English
Bryan English is a freelance (mainly unpaid)  writer living in the wilds of Eastern Washington. He is currently pursuing a post-graduate degree and is trying to save up enough money for the day he can return south to warmer climes.

Sue Feder
Sue was born talking, and learned to read shortly thereafter. She eventually combined these talents by sidling over to people and recommending books to them. In addition to starting her own monthly mystery review column, Magical Mystery Tour (now available on the web), and plaguing most of the mystery fanzines at least once, she pounced upon the unsuspecting Ellis Peters and founded The Ellis Peters Appreciation Society, which she ran for seven years, editing and publishing its quarterly journal, Most Loving Mere Folly.

Having nailed Ellis Peters to the wall, Sue began casting her eyes around for another writer to torment. When they all ran and hid, she decided to get even with the whole bunch of them at once, and founded The Historical Mystery Appreciation Society in 1998. She edited and publishied its quarterly journal, Murder: Past Tense until her death in 2005. I'll miss her.

Ted Fitzgerald
Ted's a mystery critic, mostly for The Drood Review, as well as the creator of Massachusetts private eye Matthew Gereghty. Ted was a recent finalist for the American Crime Writers League Ellen Nehr Award, an "unexpected and most pleasant surprise", and has served on the Best Novel Committee for the The Private Eye Writers of America Shamus Awards. He's contributed files and numerous comments on several TV shows.

Jack French
Jack French has been collecting, researching and writing about OTR for over 20 years. He is a former editor of the journal of the North American Radio Archives and present editor of Radio Recall, the publication of the Metro Washington OTR Club , of which he is a past president. He is a 1993 recipient of the Allen Rockford Award and the 2004 recipient of the Ray Standish Award, both presented by the Friends of Old Time Radio for his research contributions. His articles have appeared in many hobby publications and are on the Internet at OTR web sites. A retired FBI Agent in Fairfax, VA, he is a professional actor and author. His short story "The Japanese Sandman" (A Candy Matson mystery) was published in the anthology It's That Time Again. Jack's 2004 book Private Eyelashes: Radio's Lady Detectives has received excellent reviews and won the Agatha Award in 2005 for Best Mystery Non-Fiction. This book is available at www.bearmanormedia.com.

Christopher Friesen
Chris is an electronics engineering technologist and a part-time freelance writer. His work has appeared in print in Kerlak Enterprises "Who Would Kill a Clown" anthology and RV Technician Magazine. His work has also appeared on-line at Busy Parents Online, The Truth Magazine, Book Pleasures and ThugLit. He is based in southern Manitoba, Canada, and writes from his home where he lives with his wife and two children.

Ray Garraty
The pseudonym of a Russian mystery reader, blogger and hip-hop fanatic, taken from a character in the Stephen King novel The Long Walk. Check out his English-language blog, Endless Falls Up.

Damien Gay
Damien is a 40ish Sagittarius who hails from Sydney : Australia, and is the man behind the amazing Crime Down Under blog and the equally spectacular Australian Crime Fiction Database web site. If it's crime, and it's down under, Damien's your man.

Mark Geldmeyer
Mark's thirty-something and works at an AM radio station in Wisconsin. He has two BA degrees, one in Theatre and one in Radio/TV/Film. Among his many interests are hard-boiled detective stories. He ranks The Rockford Files as one of his all time favourite television programs.

Christopher Gooch
Christopher has had over fifteen non-fiction articles published, including a weekly column he writes for KidsNewsRoom.org.  Recently, two of his short stories were accepted for the Spring Mystical Tales anthology.  Despite all this, though, he assures us that his real passion is mystery fiction--both as a reader and a writer.  He's also a member of the Short Mystery Fiction Society.

Christopher Gumprich
Life-long private eye fan Chris Gumprich is the writer of the neo-PI comics Evening Shift and Ace Fedora, Private Eye. He's currently working on his first prose novel and first full-length graphic novel.

Al Guthrie
Al lives in Edinburgh, Scotland and is currently working on his second novel, Hope. His first, Blithe Psychopaths, was short-listed for the Crime Writers' Association of Great Britain Debut Dagger Award 2001.

Bill Hagen

Greg Harness
Having been told numerous times to "Keep His Day Job!" Greg pays his bills by working as a project manager for an information technology company. In the past he has tried his had at careers ranging from delivering pizzas to delivering flowers to delivering subpoenas, but has has yet to deliver a knockout punch. As a youngster, Greg got hooked on mysteries by reading The Hardy Boys and Encyclopedia Brown; now in his spare time, he is doing his best to get his kids hooked on mysteries. His six-year-old daughter was greatly impressed when recently he pointed out the similarities between the opening paragraphs of the classic Chet Gecko tale, The Chameleon wore Chartreuse, and The Little Sister written by some hack or other. And speaking of The Little Sister check out Greg's web site, 449 Idaho Street. But not if you're from Manhattan, Kansas.

Mike Harris
Mike has been a licensed private investigator in North Carolina for over 10 years, and keeps up with the genre. His domain names are Hero-For-Hire.net and .com ,but right now the main contact for him is simply his business number: 919-260-1920.

Seth Harwood
Seth, the creator of Jack Palms, grew up in the Boston area, graduated from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop in 2002 and currently lives in Berkeley, CA with his wife Joelle and their dog. He’s been a commodities floor trading clerk, bartender, copy-editor for Avon Products, rare book cataloguer, librarian, English teacher and freelance journalist. His stories have been published in Post Road, Ecotone, Inkwell, Sojourn: A Journal of the Arts, and The Red Rock Review, among others, as well as in the online journals Storyglossia, zeek.net and whyzine.com. His story “White” was nominated for a Pushcart prize. He currently teaches writing and literature at the City College of San Francisco.

John Heaton
John, who hails from Leesburg, Virginia, became a mystery fan while still in elementary school, when a copy of "Alfred Hitchcock And The Three Investigators In The Secret Of Terror Castle" caught his eye at a school book sale. While he retains a fondness for Jupe, Pete, and Bob -- and is prepared to forcefully argue that they, unlike those amateurs Joe and Frank Hardy, are full-fledged private investigators who deserve to be included in the Thrilling Detective PI database -- he has also grown to favour more mature characters like Matthew Scudder and Dan Fortune, and immature ones like Elvis Cole and Stephanie Plum. He will read anything by Max Allan Collins, even I Love Trouble.

Monte Herridge
Monte lives in Central Texas, and is in the 40-something age range (plenty of room to work there). He has an M.A. in History, and an M.S. in Library Science. He's read in all areas of detective and mystery, but his favorite area is the period of the 1920s-50s pulps. monte says, "There are plenty of excellent unpublished detective and mystery stories in the pulps. I have written one article about pulp detectives, and am working on others, all for the pulp fanzines. I don't consider myself a pulp expert, but I do know a little about the subject."

Don B. Hilliard
Don was introduced to the world of private eyes at age four via his grandmother's Sherlock Holmes paperbacks and the parody "Meat Hamburg" in Walt Kelly's Pogo comic strip. Stout, Hammett, Chandler and Spillane are still his P.I. benchmarks, but they're just a short nose ahead of Mosely, Paretsky, Kantner and Estleman...and those are just the top choices. Add The Rockford Files, The Fat Man and I Love A Mystery from the tube and the radio. Don took a two-year degree in Film, went on to learn the practical stuff as a reporter and producer for Armed Forces Radio and Television, and presently works in broadcast and industrial video production in Oakland, California. Reads (and sometimes writes) mystery, science-fiction, non-fiction, comics and nearly everything else. Small anachronisms are a way of life: he still prefers a manual typewriter for most writing, shaves with a Gillette Blue Blade, gets his news via the radio and papers, and drinks bourbon with a Schlitz back.

Allen J. (Al) Hubin

If Al had to write his own entry, it would probably read something like this: (1936--, B.S. Wheaton College, Wheaton Illinois, 1958; M.S., Organic Chemistry, U. of Minnesota, 1961. Married to Marilyn Hagstrom, 1958- ; five children and (so far) eight grandchildren. ariously chemist, patent and trademark specialist, technical education manager, human resources manager, head of patent liaison organization, 3M, 1961-1995. Founder, editor and
publisher, The Armchair Detective, 1967-1975; later editor only. Editor of seven Best Detective Stories of the Year anthologies, Dutton, 1969-1974. Mystery reviewer ("Criminals at Large" column), New York Times Book Review, 1969-1971. Mystery reviewer, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, 1984-1988. Also reviewer in The Amchair Detective, Mystery Fancier, and Deadly Pleasures. Crime fiction bibliographer, beginning serially in The
Armchair Detective and ending (so far) with Crime Fiction III: A Comprehensive Bibliography, 1749-1995 (CD-ROM).

Cameron Hughes
Cameron reviews for January Magazine, The Rap Sheet, Crimespree Magazine, CHUD and any other publications that will have him -- including us. Like Don Winslow's Boone Daniels, he lives in San Diego.

Chaim Mattis Keller
Chaim is a comic book, mystery and science fiction enthusiast who makes his living as a computer programmer in New York City. When not working or spending time with his wife and four children, he writes fan fiction and articles for Fanzing, much of it featuring future detective Star Hawkins, and maintains a help file of information about the Legion of Super-Heroes . He's also crazy about Kinsey Millhone, the works of Douglas Adams, and the Kansas City Royals.

Rudyard Kennedy
Rudy is a Toronto-based television writer. He's written for all sorts of shows you've never heard of, and a few shows that he wishes he'd never heard of. (He did manage to avoid Dellaventura, at least...) Rudy used to teach comedy writing, but gave it up when he realized he was only encouraging people to compete for the jobs he wanted for himself. His favourite hobbies are time traveling, lying, and writing about himself in the third person.

Diana Killian
Los Angeles-based writer and reviewer Diana Killian is a relative newcomer to the hard-boiled genre, but she's no stranger to the mystery world. Besides founding and moderating the Wicked Company writing group, she's written several mystery novels under an intriguing array of pseudonyms, and has co-edited Down These Wicked Streets, a collection of private eye stories with Kevin Burton Smith. She's also the creator of Mary Kelly, a young private eye and would-be pulp writer in 1930s Los Angeles.

Marcia Kiser
Marcia lives and writes in Lubbock-- in the heart of West Texas. Her husband, Eckert, and her dog, Kaiser Sosei (The Usual Suspects) are both very supportive. Marcia has been published in Murderous Intent Mystery Magazine, Nefarious, Mystery Scene, Lady M's Mysterious Universe, Over My Dead Body, Futures, Mysterical-e, and Without A Clue, which she co-founded. She's also had two non-fction articles on writing (How to Outline a Murder and How to Pick a Murder Weapon) included in the Novel Advice Anthology (just recently released). A busy girl, Marcia is also a member of Sisters in Crime, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Second Amendment Sisters. She's currently working on a series of what she considers cozy novels set in West Texas; unfortunately, she says, "while I want to write cozies, I always seem to write a little more hard boiled."

John Koenig
John is the webmaster of www.darkromance.com.

Terrill Lankford
URL:
http://www.terrillleelankford.com/

Terrill is a filmmaker and novelist who has over twenty-five films and two novels (including the acclaimed neo-noir Shooters, Angry Moon and the upcoming Earthquake Weather) to his credit. He lives in Los Angeles, but hopes he won't die there.

Darren Latta
The editor and founder of the highly recommended web site, The Masked Bookwyrm's Graphic Novel and Trade Paperback Reviews.

Laurent Lehmann
The other half of our French connection.

Robert Lee
Robert has been a serious crime writer for five years, having cut his teeth on everyone from Carroll John Daly to Walter Mosley, and preparing to publish a collection of his crime fiction entitled Gunsels, GunMolls, & Private Dicks. His work has previously been published on Plots With Guns & SciFi-stories.com. Before that, he'd gone to college, studying illustration and graphic art. He's collected comic books for ten+ years, and still rememberis when comics were colored with zip-o-tone (do a search, he says, if you're not that old). He's also the creator of private eye Xavier Mason.

Hugh Lessig
Author Hugh Lessig, besides being a contributor to this site, is a newspaper reporter in the Richmond, Virginia area. Many of his stories honor the spirit of the hardboiled newspaperman, including his hero Kennedy, the hard-drinking reporter created by Frederick Nebel. He writes about ace reporters Picasso Smith and Alamo Barnes, whose adventures take place right about now -- and of course, Picasso Jr. He's now at work on a Picasso Smith Jr. novel, and has written several short stories that have nothing to do with newspapers or reporters or even drinking. They're just stories.

H. Kelly Levendorf
Acknowledging that by age 40, his earliest aspiration to be the third Hardy Boy or the Fourth Investigator was not going to work out, and, with no hair left to pull out from nearly twenty years in the medical malpractice insurance industry, H. Kelly Levendorf "retired" to South Florida in January, 2000 to become a full-time scuba diving instructor-trainer living, for a time, aboard a boat at Ft. Lauderdale's Bahia Mar Marina. Originally from Weirton, WV and educated at The American University, Washington, DC, Kelly spends his days teaching other early retirees how to teach diving and his evenings both reading and swearing he is about to finally finish his own novel...

Steve Lewis
Editor and founder of The Mystery*File.

Dick Lochte
Dick Lochte is the author of the award-winning Sleeping Dog (recently named one of the 100 Favorite Mysteries of the Century by the Independent Booksellers Association), the short story collection Lucky Dog and Other Tales of Murder, and the co-author, with attorney Christopher Darden, of several legal thrillers including The Last Defense. His latest novel is Croaked!, a thriller that recalls Dick's own days working for Playboy, due out at the end of April 2007.

Keith Logan
Keith is one of the few contributors I've actually met. He used to work at Nebula, Montreal's late, lamented hangout for fans of "Books, Comics and Magazines devoted to the Fantastic, the Imaginative and the Weird." Keith is currently manning our Gaspé desk, where he's the best looking Anglo for 400 miles. He's also contributed files on sci-fi eyes such as Greg Mandel and Quintilian.

Geoff Loker
Geoff lives in Toronto, and is an avid reader with eclectic tastes. He's been reading mysteries for most of his life, and has a decided preference for the more lasting pulp authors. His favourite author is Cornell Woolrich, "who almost never wrote about private detectives, but who often wrote about ordinary people who fell into trouble and had to do their own detecting to get out of it." Lately, Geoff has developed an interest in OTR, and has discovered some of the more recent CBC dramas, including their "Mystery Project", which has produced some excellent mysteries. He's recently created a log for the show. In addition to the log, there are summaries (of a sort) of the various series it has presented. It can be found at http://www.geocities.com/gloker.geo/otr/index.html.

Jan Long
Jan's one of those pesky folks who keeps me on the straight and narrow, and going towards the light. She's also one of those two-fisted, hardboiled accountants you always hear about, but rarely meet, not to mention a virtual treasure trove of trivia. You can blame Snooper and Blabber's inclusion on her. She still has her button and pictures from the "Official Huckleberry Hound Fan Club." And don't even get her started on hippos...

Marianne Macdonald
Marianne was born in the lumber town of Kenora, Northern Ontario, and grew up in Winnipeg and Montreal. Her first children's book was published when she was 16. She took her BA at McGill University, then went to Oxford for graduate studies in English. For thirty years she pretended to be an academic, acquiring various degrees and teaching at universities in Canada and England. She left teaching early in order to return to her writing. She now lives in a tall Victorian house on top of Muswell Hill in London, with open fireplaces in the cellar and stained glass in the attic windows, where she writes the Dido Hoare series about a thirty-something London single mother and antiquarian book shop owner who is forever finding herself involved in various murder and mayhem.

Todd Mason
Runner-up in a AHMM "write a vignette about this photo" contest a couple of months ago was aspiring writer and short fiction buff Todd's first submission and the first time my name's been in a mystery magazine, but he's already published a short story in Tomorrow Speculative Fiction (recommended, but alas not reprinted, in the 1995 Year's Best Fantasy and Horror), poetry in Scavenger's Newsletter, and non-fiction of various sorts in Social Anarchism, The Progressive, Maximum Rocknroll, Ka Leo O Hawaii, Factsheet Five,Whack!, and a number of other places, but as far as Todd knows only the bit in Profane Existence has been extensively quoted in anyone's published Master's thesis (his name was misspelled). He expects to do more writing ANY TIME NOW!. Todd's been reading crime fiction regularly since getting hooked on the Alfred Hitchcock Presents anthologies at age 9; prefers Hammett to Chandler, and vastly prefers MacDonald to Spillane, but will read them all.

Don McGregor
An often innovative and ground-breaking comic writer, Don's given us such unique gumshoes as Nathaniel Dusk, Alexander and Penelope Risk and Detectives, Inc. He confesses that his love affair with private eyes probably started with 77 Sunset Strip. In his early teens, he was positive if you looked up the word "suave" in the dictionary you'd see a picture of Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. His first private eye comic was actually a fanzine version of Detectives, Inc. way back in 1969 (the characters of Rainier and Denning were originally designed for him and Alex "Blackjack" Simmons to play on film). Early on, Don had commandeered his dad's 8mm Bolex camera, and discovered that if you wrote the movie, and directed the movie and starred in it, you always won the fights. Through his long and varied career in comics, he's written for Creepy Magazine, and scripted such tiles as Panther's Rage, the first comic by a mainstream publisher to have a virtually all-black cast; Killraven, with Craig Russell; the Sabre graphic novel, and the acclaimed Ragamuffins with Gene Colan, the first comic printed in color from an artist's pencils (no ink cartridges!). This style was later used to great effect in the second Detectives, Inc. series, and in both Nathaniel Dusk series. Don's currently writing the Zorro newspaper strip, and riding through the wind-swept night, though he swears he'll never abandon his beloved eyes.

Christopher Mills
Chris is a thirty-something writer, editor and graphic artist, born and raised in Central Maine but currently residing in South Florida. He's been a fan of hardboiled fiction since he read his first Donald Hamilton and Mickey Spillane novels at age fifteen. As an editor, he's been lucky enough to work with the aforementioned Mickey Spillane, along with Max Allan Collins, Ed Gorman and a host of other notable mystery writers on such comic book projects as Mike Danger, Lady Justice and The Detectives. He also created and edited the short-lived illustrated crime fiction magazine, Noir. His writing credits include eleven issues of the sci-fi comic book Leonard Nimoy's Primortals, several comic books and short stories featuring his own creation, Nightmark (AKA Gideon King, a hardboiled PI in a gothic horror setting), and a series of short stories featuring Portland, Maine private eye Matthew Dain. Chris is currently Art Director for a national weekly tabloid and is co-founder of Shadow House Press, publishers of the horror anthology comic Shadow House. His latest project is the Supernatural Crime website, featuring the weekly free comic strip adventures of Femme Noir, a mysterious female eye.

Richard Moore
Richard A. Moore is the author of three novels and several short stories published by Ellery Queen, Alfred Hitchcock and Mike Shayne mystery magazines and various anthologies. He debuted in the July 1978 issue of Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine as EQ's "First Story" Number 499. His novel Death in the Past was named one of "One Hundred Notable Novels of Detection" by Marv Lachman in his The American Novel of Detection. One of his short stories was selected for Best Horror Stories of the Year Series VIII, edited by Karl Edward Wagner. Growing up in rural Georgia, Moore was hooked on mysteries by paperbacks featuring Mike Shayne, Mike Hammer and anything by John D. MacDonald and Frederic Brown. Paperbacks were 25 cents and on monthly forays to Atlanta used copies were two for a quarter. It was a good time to begin a collection. A former reporter and press secretary, Moore now lives in Alexandria, Virginia and works in Washington, DC for a public relations firm.

Gary Warren Niebuhr
This man seems to know almost everything there is to know about private eyes. Besides running P.I.E.S. (The Private Investigator Entertainment Service), an online used book store specializing in the genre, he's the author of the absolutely essential A Reader's Guide To Private Eye Novels, and he's been working on an ambitious project called the EYECYCLOPEDIA. Gary pictured himself doing one volume a year but "that was several years ago and volume A is not out yet. Every Bouchercon," he says, " I keep telling people, next Bouchercon, Volume A will be out. " His succinct definition of what a private eye is or isn't can be found here. His online catalog at P.I.E.S. has proven to be an invaluable resource for this site. Go there and buy plenty of books from him.

Jenifer Nightingale
Jenifer was born on a dark and stormy night. No, honest, it's true -- embarrassing, really, but true. What choice did she have but to become a mystery addict? A music teacher by day, by night she loves nothing more than slipping into something more comfortable -- usually something dark, hardboiled and filled with dead bodies. Jenifer reviews for several sites on the net, including I Love a Mystery, Reviewing the Evidence and Scribesworld.com, for whom she's also an author liaison. She line edits for FMAM, though they have yet to spell her name correctly, and runs several international bookswaps. Jenifer has also been known to bump off co-workers in an occasional short story...

David Nobriga
David Nobriga is a bookseller in Fort Worth, Texas.

Juri Nummelin
Blog: Pulpetti
Juri is a Master of Arts living in Turku, Finland. His thesis had absolutely nothing to do with the private eye world: it dealt with the theme of loneliness in texts of Martin Luther, René Descartes, Daniel Defoe and Xavier de Maistre. But he has been a fan of hard-boiled literature since his early teens, and now devotes his time almost entirely to it. His book Pulpografia (2000) is a bibliography, with commentary, of pulp fiction and paperback writers translated and published in Finland. It features a ton of information about obscure and forgotten writers in the bibliography, as well as such hailed writers as Elmore Leonard and Richard Stark. Juri thinks that two pages of Raymond Chandler wipe out almost everything in the genre, but he thinks there are other great writers; Day Keene, Gil Brewer, Norbert Davis, Ross Macdonald, James Ellroy, Richard Matheson, W.T. Ballard etc. and considers Peter Rabe's "Anatomy of a Killer" a masterpiece. Juri's other interests include cinema (he lectures on it at Tampere University), cooking, architecture and his daughter Ottilia. Juri tries to write some fiction, mostly featuring his New York private eye Joe Novak, but claims he doesn't have enough time to concentrate properly.

Sam Phillips
Sam is embarrassed to admit how much reading she does. And no, she's not the singer or the producer.

J. Kingston Pierce
The crime fiction editor of January Magazine, the guiding force behind its blog offshoot, The Rap Sheet, and a proud resident of Seattle, Washington, Jeff is also the author of several non-fiction books, including "America's Historic Trails with Tom Bodett" (KQED Books, 1997) and "San Francisco, You're History!" (Sasquatch Books, 1995). He's currently completing work on a collection of essays about Seattle's eccentric past.

Joe Posner
Joe, who shares a name with Jeremy Pikser's fictional P.I., is a freelance writer, California licensed Security Officer and unlicensed Private Guy. Mr. Posner's work has appeared in a variety of print and Internet media outlets including The Los Angeles Times, the West Covina Weekly and disabilityhappens.com, among many others. His latest book, "Chasing Paychecks: The Fabulous 52," is due out in 2008. Joe, who resides in Southern California's Inland Empire, is married with fur.

James M. Reasoner
A professional author for nearly thirty years, James Reasoner has written over 170 novels in a variety of genres. He is best known in the mystery field for his cult classic private eye novel Texas Wind, which was recently reprinted by PointBlank Press. His most recent projects are a contemporary crime novel, Dust Devils, which will also be published by PointBlank Press, and Call to Arms, a Civil War novel written in collaboration with his wife, which will be published by Cumberland House.

Rene Ribic

Rick Robinson
Rick hails from Portland, Oregon, and is responsible for our List of Current Publishers of Hardboiled and Detective Fiction, and a whole bunch of other neat stuff, on this site. One of the first supporters of this site, he's also one of the guys that I count on to try to keep me honest.

Brian D. Rubendall
An inhabitant of the Northern Virginia suburbs of D.C., Brian is a real life criminal investigator for the U.S. Department of State. He's also an aspiring novelist, and is currently looking for an agent to represent his first novel, a hard-boiled private detective yarn. When not writing, he spends much of his time reading, primarily private eye fiction, science fiction, and history of all types. He has also contributed over 900 book and music reviews to Amazon.com. 900? Egad!!!

Bryan Schingle
Bryan Schingle is a 21 year old college student, majoring in criminal justice, who thinks that he's Mike Hammer, but is probably a lot more like Dirk Gently. In the future, he hopes to write some damn good private eye novels, or at least be a damn good private eye himself. When he's not writing or studying, he is a security dispatcher, a movie buff and a mediocre guitarist.

Charles Shafer
Charlie retired from the Chicago PD after 28 years, 25 as a detective. His short fiction and articles have appeared world wide, in such magazines as Crime Time, Crime Factory, Mystery Scene, and Murderous Intent, along with the web zine, Blue Murder. His first novel, On Cabrini Green, was published by Crime Time Publishing in 2000. His second, Chicago Stretch, will be released summer, 2003 by Hilliard and Harris. Charlie writes "Tales From the Lockup" for this site.

Duke Seabrook
Duke's a downhomer, hailing from Sydney, Nova Scotia, and doesn't care who knows it. He's also a bit of a ramblin' kinda guy --he's been a mechanic, a bartender, a fisherman, a musician, a law student, and a journalist, and he's lived all over the place. He still hasn't decided what he'll do when he grows up yet, but he assures us he'll let us posted. He's been reading detective fiction since his teens, when he discovered a box of Shell Scotts and Miike Hammers belonging to the captain of the fishing boat he was working on.

Ben Solomon
Ben is the creator of The Hard-Boiled Detective, a subscription-based pulp mag on the web, a delicious and unapologetic throwback to another, simpler era; an era of broad-shouldered he-men and soft-shouldered broads, where fedoras and trenchoats are the order of the day and the roscoes spit ka-chow ka-chow all night long.

James Stephenson
James is a long-time fan of hard-boiled literature. He received his BA in English Lit from George Washington University in 1983, and an MS in LS from Catholic University (also in DC) in 1988. He works as a rare books cataloger at the Getty Research Institute, part of the Getty Museum complex in Los Angeles. He currently resides in Sherman Oaks, but he wouldn't call that living.

Mark Sullivan
True Confession time: "Okay, what do I say about myself? I'm a 40-something over-educated (MA in American Studies; finishing my PhD dissertation in Public Communications) cashier in a grocery store. I am an active consumer of popular culture and I have written about it in various places, both academic and small local papers. Most of that writing has been on popular music, though. I have also taught several courses about popular music at the Smithsonian Institution. As far as mysteries go, I tend to prefer private eye novels. I started with Chandler, Hammett and Ross MacDonald. However, I now tend to read more recent authors, although not too long ago, I went through all the David Goodis I could find and still work in a Chester Himes or Jim Thompson here and there. Lately, I've been reading many of the new Brit hardboiled school, the Fresh Blood authors."

Duane Swierczynski
Duane lives in Pennsylvania, and is a freelance writer and editor. He's worked for many magazines, including Details, Men's Health, Cosmopolitan, Success and Philadelphia, and has contributed short fiction to such on-line publications such as GothicNet, Dark Planet, and Fright Net. He grew up in Philadelphia, playing keyboards in his father's eerily Partridge Family-like wedding band since the age of 10. Therapy has helped a great deal. He was also one of the very first contributors to this site, and has subsequently written numerous books, including the surreal P.I. novel Secret Dead Men.

Mario Taboada
Mario Taboada was a writer and translator from Albemarle County, Virginia. He was a long-time contributor (and later moderator) to the Rara-Avis forum on hard-boiled literature, and a good friend to this site.

Lawrence R. (Dick) Tartow, M.D.
Dr. Dick is our resident medical expert, currently residing in Tampa Florida. I'm hoping he contributes a list of some sort so I can work in the phrase "Doctor, My Eyes"....

George Upper

Peter Walker
Our Liverpool connection, and my very first e-mail pal. Peter Walker is from the UK. He's a regular contributor to Crime Time magazine (which he highly recommends!), as well as this site. He has written about a number of his favourite authors on the net, in particular Eddie Bunker (the article's currently residing at 'The Richmond Review'). Despite being from the UK, Peter's favourite writers are mostly American, particularly the hard-boiled PI/Police variety, although he keeps the home fires burning for the Brit PI and thinks the Nick Sharman books should be taught at 'A' level. Peter spends his time between his allottment, supporting his footie team (Liverpool), reading and his daughter. He's contributed files on this site on Mike Hammer, Lew Archer and Dave Brandstetter, among others.
(Pete's an all-round good sort. His help on this site, even when it was unintentional, has been invaluable.)

August West
The editor and founder of the highly recommended Vintage Hardboiled Reads.

David White
David is a Rutgers University graduate. After spending four years reading detecitve fiction instead of the assigned stuff, he figured he'd better put it to use. His senior thesis was both a novel and a exploration of the detective novel featuring private eye Jackson Donne, who has also appeared in several stories, including "God Bless the Child" and "Closure" on this site.

James R. Winter
Creator of the Nick Kepler series, his work has appeared or is pending in Plots With Guns, Nefarious, Judas, and Hardluck Stories. He can be found on the web at http://home.earthlink.net/~winter_writes.

Stewart Wright
Our expert on old-time radio and a member of The Radio Historical Association of Colorado, for whom he edits "Return With Us Now....", the association newsletter. Stewart remembers listening to Old-Time Radio (OTR) shows before they were Old-Time; listening to them over Armed Forces Radio in Germany in 1952. He also remembers when radio drama left the U.S. air waves in the early 1960's. Started collecting OTR shows about 5 years ago. Enjoys the current radio drama of Jim French on KIRO Mystery Playhouse and Imagination Theatre; especially Jim's continuing detective series "The Adventures of Harry Nile."



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